Avoiding Work Related Injuries

How to Avoid Work Related Injuries

Work related injuries can happen suddenly and at any time. Work environments can be rough. It’s important to take care of your health and try and always report a work injury. Far too many people never report their accidents and never receive the medical treatment they need to fully recover. In 2018 alone, there were roughly 5,250 fatal work injuries ad 2.8 million workplace injuries and illnesses reported. Accidents happen, but a job-related injury should not result in a financial strain for you and your family. To avoid work related injuries it is critical to understand what it means to be safe, not exposed to danger or risk, and the possibility of harm will be lowered. Follow these tips to lower your chances of an unfortunate work accident.

Wear Slip Resistant Shoes– Worn out shoes are known to contribute to slip-and-fall risk, a common cause of workplace injuries.

Proper Housecleaning- Controlling fall- related injuries comes down to conducting regular risk assessments and eliminating all hazards that can increase your risk of slipping, tripping, and falls.

Listen to Your Body- Fatigue, discomfort and pain can be clear indicators that a workplace injury could be on the horizon.

Wear Protecting Gear- If you’re required to work at dangerous heights and jobs, wear the proper gear to ensure your safety.

Check In- Dangerous jobs that have you working alone can increase the level of severe injury. Conduct regular check ins with your company or use proactive monitory incase you suffer an injury or fall when no one is around.

The most-common workplace injuries correlate to some of the most-common workplace accidents. According to the NSC, the three most-common accident types resulting in time missed from work are:

  • Overexertion – This includes lifting, lowering, bending, and repetitive stress.
  • Contact with objects and equipment – This includes being struct by, caught or compressed between, or crushed by machinery, falling objects, and collapsing structures and equipment.
  • Slips, trips, and falls – Falls can cause a variety of types of traumatic injuries, whether they involve slipping on a wet floor or falling from height due to a ladder failure or faulty handrail.

The more distracted, social environment a worker is in, the more likely one is inclined to disregard safe behavior. Be aware of your surroundings and the risk of operating or conducting a job. Sometimes being familiar with a job and action can cause one to increase their carelessness, increasing the likelihood of a work-related injury. Stay aware and safe. Take precautions to ensure your health stays intact.

Injured on the Job? Know your Legal Rights

If you have suffered any type of job-related injury, it is important to know your legal rights. You may be entitled to compensation for your medical bills, missed time from work, and other losses, and an experienced work injury lawyer can help you collect the compensation you deserve. Seek a lawyer to learn about your rights and make sure you maximize your financial and physical recovery.

Plantar Fasciitis

Finding the source of pain in your heel

Plantar fasciitis presents itself in the form of pain in the heal, the thick tissue that connects your heel to your toes is called plantar fascia. Plantar Fasciitis is commonly caused by strain injury causing micro-tears to the ligament as it attaches to the heel bone or other areas of tightness on the sole of the foot. Plantar fasciitis often presents itself with stabbing pain in the first steps after you wake up or have been immobile for an extended amount of time, It can also manifest after prolonged amounts of standing. 

Facts:

  • Roughly about 10% of the population will suffer from Plantar Fasciitis
  • Age: range effected are those between 40-60 years of age
  • Weight: obesity plays a factor in 70% of plantar fasciitis cases
  • Heel spurs are often found in roughly 50% of plantar fasciitis cases

Treatment:

Physical therapy: This will help to stretch the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and to strengthen lower leg muscles. Often athletic taping is also demonstrated by a therapist to help support the bottom of your foot.

Splint: A splint, often worn at night that stretches your calf and the arch of your foot while you sleep. This helps to keep your plantar fascia and Achilles tendon in an extended potion to stretch them while you rest.

Arch supports: arch supports often referred to as orthotics are often used to help evenly distribute the weight more evenly.

Surgery: Surgery is generally only an option after several other failed treatments. 

Prevention:

Weight: Maintaining a healthy weight will alleviate un-needed strain on your plantar fascia

Shoes: Wear shoes with lots of support and cushioning, and when your running shoes start to wear out, replace them. 

Stretch: Stretching helps the flexibility and range of motion within your plantar fascia and Achilles tension cutting down on the potential for strain or injury.

Covid-19 Outbreak Update

Covid-19 Outbreak – A Special Message To Our Patients

To Our Patients:

Due to the latest events of the Covid-19 outbreak, we want to ensure you of our commitment to your health and safety.  At this time we are open and taking extra precautions to ensure cleanliness in our clinics.  We are closely monitoring the situation to ensure we are doing everything we can to keep our staff protected and our patients.

Please do not come into the clinics if you are sick or showing symptoms.  As we monitor the situation we are limiting visitors, and ask that patient’s escorts wait in their vehicles, limiting the amount of people in our waiting areas.  We ask that only patient’s come into the office unless a caregiver is medically necessary.

If you are currently scheduled for a routine follow up visit or elective surgery we may be calling to discuss rescheduling or you may call us at (208) 966-4476.

SI Joint Repair

Relief of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

The sacroiliac (SI) joint is the joint between the sacrum and the ilium bones. This joint is similar to the shocks on the car, it is meant to absorb and transfer force between the body and legs. We have a right and left SI joint.

Staying Hydrated

Tips for Staying Hydrated

The amount of water needed for proper hydration varies from person to person, but Ready.gov recommends about three quarters of a gallon of fluid daily for normally active people. Use that as a baseline and adjust depending on age, health, climate, and physical condition and activity.

Sometimes you may need to be more conscientious about your water intake. Here are some tips:

  • Don’t wait until you’re thirst – drink water constantly!
  • Avoid alcohol or sugary liquids
  • Keep a bottle of water with you throughout the day
  • Add a slice of lemon to your water – this improves the flavor and can help you drink more
  • Drink water when you’re hungry. Thirst can be confused with hunger, so try water first

It’s more obvious that you need to be more careful about staying hydrated during the hot summer months, but you can still become dehydrated during the colder times. No matter what time of year it is, pay attention to what your body is telling you and take the necessary steps to always remain hydrated.

Youth Sports

Youth Sports and Injury Prevention

With sports camps and more structured activities, kids today are increasingly likely to play their chosen sport year-round. But more time on the field brings a greater risk of experiencing sports-related injuries.

Here are our top injury prevention tips to help keep your young athlete on the field and not sidelined:

Get Talking

Make sure your child understands that they should talk with you and seek help if experiencing a pain or something that just doesn’t feel right. Some young athletes don’t understand that pain shouldn’t be ignored or pushed through. Keep the dialog open. You can also observe any changes in gait or activity. Many young athletes will change up how they perform instead of admitting an injury.

Get Physical

A preseason or back-to-school physical is a great way to determine if your young athlete is fit to play. A physical can address any possible pre-existing conditions or diagnose the health of your child before the season starts.

Change it Up

Cross training is a great way to build new muscle and also give your body a break.. Change up your routine so the same muscles aren’t continuously taxed by the same activity. Throw in swimming, yoga or even walking to take a break during the sports season.

Get Bendy

Stretching is an important prevention technique that should become habit for all athletes before starting an activity or sport. Both static and dynamic stretching during warmups to help loosen the muscles and prepare them for play. Toe touches and stretches, where you hold the position for a certain amount of time, are considered static, while jumping jacks and stretches, where the body continues to move during stretching, are considered dynamic.

Get your ZZZ’s

Athletes of all ages need to rest between practices, games and events. A lack of sleep and muscle fatigue predispose an athlete to injury. The most common injuries seen in young athletes are overuse injuries — too many sports and not enough rest. Along these same lines, parents should also plan an offseason for their athlete, giving him or her adequate time to recuperate before the next season.

Check your diet

It’s important for athletes to eat a well-balanced diet full of fruits, vegetables and lean proteins, and to maintain a regular eating schedule. For instance, have breakfast, lunch and dinner around the same time each day. Also make sure in sports such as wrestling where maintaining a weight is required that your child is eating enough and has a healthy relationship with food.

Drink Up

Heat-related illness is a real concern for athletes, especially during hot and humid days. Parents should make sure their children have adequate water before, during and after play, and watch for any signs of a heat-related illness, including fatigue, nausea, vomiting, confusion or fainting.

Get Equipped

Protective equipment, like helmets, pads and shoes, are very important for injury prevention. Parents should talk with coaches before the season starts so that they have adequate time to purchase the correct equipment. Improper fit of equipment or worn out shoes can create possibly injury and issues and should be replaced or repaired before the season starts.

Check In

Check in on how your child is feeling and performing. If you notice that there is a change in your child’s technique, such as a limp when running, throwing differently or rubbing a leg during activity, they should pull the athlete out of play. If the problems persists, seek an assessment for your child prior to returning to the activity.

When to see OSSM for your sports-related injury:

  1. Consistent pain during or after sports
  2. Persistent or new swelling around a joint
  3. Recurrent instability – joints “give way”
  4. Painful pops (nonpainful pops are OK)
  5. Pain that does not respond to a period of rest